Diabetic shock

5 July 2014
Comments: 0
5 July 2014, Comments: 0

Individuals who suffer from diabetes are likely to experience hypoglycemia which is commonly called as diabetic shock. It is important to note that the condition can manifest any time once the individual suffers from low blood sugar level due to skipping meals or increased physical activity. Luckily, the condition is easy to identify and there are treatment options available.

What you need to know about glucose?

Glucose or blood sugar is the main source of energy by the body. All the cells in the body require glucose to function properly. The body produces glucose from food, mainly carbohydrates such as pasta, rice, potatoes and other starches. Take note that these foods are broken down into glucose in the stomach and then distributed to the entire body where insulin helps the cells use it.

Among healthy individuals, the feeling of low blood sugar can occur if the individual does not eat for an extended period. Nevertheless, the pancreas typically controls the blood sugar levels by releasing the stored glucose reserves. There are certain factors that can determine if the individual will experience low blood sugar which includes the consumption of alcohol or certain medications as well as endocrine deficiencies, tumors and diabetes.

Who are at risk for diabetes shock?

While individuals who do not have any metabolic issues can experience symptoms of low blood sugar, an actual hypoglycemia or diabetic shock typically occur among those who are treated for diabetes either type 1 or type 2. Even though there are advancements in the management of diabetes, the episodes of hypoglycemia are considered as a restraining issue in accomplishing ideal blood sugar control since most of the medications that are useful in handling diabetes carry the risk of decreasing the blood sugar level excessively. Based on studies conducted on the control utilized in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugar occur more often among individuals who were treated intensively. This is vital for both the individual and doctor to recognize since the main objective for treatment involves a firmer control on the blood sugar.

Symptoms of diabetes shock

The symptoms of diabetes shock typically include shakiness, fatigue, sweating, dizziness, disorientation, nervousness, heart palpitations, cold extremities, mood swings, and cravings for sweet, headaches and sudden hunger.

Diabetic shock

The symptoms of diabetes shock typically include shakiness, fatigue, sweating, dizziness, disorientation, nervousness, heart palpitations, cold extremities, mood swings, and cravings for sweet, headaches and sudden hunger.

The signs of hypoglycemia tend to vary from one individual to another. An individual who suffers from hypoglycemia more than once must be able to recognize their individual symptoms and inform family members so that they can also help spot the condition. Disorientation is one of the common symptoms of hypoglycemia, thus family members can easily spot these symptoms before the condition of the individual worsens.

Treatment for diabetic shock

An individual with hypoglycemia must check his/her blood sugar levels. If the result of the test is low, you can manage this with basic first aid by providing sugar in order to increase the sugar level. Recommended forms of sugar include hard candy, fruit juice, glucose gel or tablets, milk, honey and regular soft drinks.

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